Case-Control: Carotenoid/Vit A & Ovarian Ca

A population-based case–control study of carotenoid and vitamin A intake and ovarian cancer (United States)

Elizabeth R. Bertone

Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health

Susan E. Hankinson

Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health

Polly A. Newcomb

University of Wisconsin Comprehensive Cancer Center; Cancer Prevention Research Program, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Bernard Rosner

Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School

Walter C. Willett

Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health; Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health

Meir J. Stampfer

Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health; Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health

Kathleen M. Egan

Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health

Abstract

Objective:

To evaluate the association between dietary intake of carotenoids and vitamin A and the incidence of ovarian cancer.

Methods: We conducted a population-based case–control study of ovarian cancer in Massachusetts and Wisconsin. Incident cases diagnosed between 1991 and 1994 were identified through statewide tumor registries. We selected community controls at random from lists of licensed drivers and Medicare recipients; 327 cases and 3129 controls were included in the analysis.

Data were collected by telephone interview, which included an abbreviated food and supplement list to quantify typical consumption of carotenoids (lutein/zeaxanthin, alpha-carotene, beta-carotene), retinol and total vitamin A at 5 years prior to diagnosis in cases, or to a comparable reference date in controls. Results were adjusted for age, state, and other risk factors.

Results:

Participants with the highest dietary intake of lutein/zeaxanthin (=24,000 [mgr]g/week) experienced a 40% lower risk of ovarian cancer (95% CI = 0.36–0.99) compared to those with the lowest intake. Intake of alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, retinol and total vitamin A was unrelated to risk.

Among foods, we observed non-significantly lower risks with high consumption of spinach, carrots, skim/lowfat milk and liver.

Conclusion: These results support previous findings suggesting an inverse relationship between carotenoid intake and ovarian cancer risk.

Cancer Causes and Control 12 (1): 83-90, January 2001 Copyright © 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers All rights reserved Article ID: 282198


Dietary Vit A, Carotenoids &  Antioxidants Reduce Risk: Ova Ca

Cancer Epid Biom Preven, March 2005


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